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Tiger becomes latest star athlete to release NFTs

Tiger becomes latest star athlete to release NFTs thumbnail

9:49 AM ET

  • Tom VanHaarenESPN Staff Writer

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    • ESPN staff writer
    • Joined ESPN in 2011
    • Graduated from Central Michigan

Tiger Woods is getting in on the latest digital craze, releasing a nonfungible token (NFT) collection through a company co-founded by Tom Brady called Autograph in a collaboration with Upper Deck.

Woods is on the Autograph advisory board, along with Tony Hawk, Derek Jeter, Wayne Gretzky, Simone Biles and Naomi Osaka. The company has already released NFTs for Brady, Gretzky and most of the other athletes on the board.

“The intersection of sports and technology is such an interesting space to me, and I’m thrilled to partner with Autograph as they lead the charge by ushering a new era of digital collecting,” Woods said in a statement. “It’s been an honor to join their advisory board among so many iconic athletes, and I’m looking forward to bringing fans closer to my memorable sports moments at an accessible price, and to the game I respect so much”

What Autograph calls the “premier” edition was released Tuesday through Autograph and DraftKings marketplace. Woods will also release a digitally autographed version that drops on Sept. 28.

The first collection will offer 10,000 digital pictures of Woods and will range in price from $12 to $100, with only 375 editions of the $100 option. There will only be 300 total NFTs available with a digital version of Woods’ signature; they will range from $250 to $1,500.

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